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Additions to TapeOp.com

For the past 11 years, Greg Wilkinson has recorded the Bay Area's crustiest punk/hardcore/grindcore/death metal/doom/black metal at Earhammer, his warehouse studio in West Oakland. He's also played...
 
Master clocks are a near necessity if you own multiple digital audio devices that are interconnected. Sure, you can forgo a master clock and just chain one digital device to the next, each...
 
I caught up with David J. Haskins, a member of the influential bands Bauhaus and Love and Rockets, during a book tour for his new memoir, Who Killed Mr....
 
We are witnessing the dawn of dramatic format changes for audio delivery. On the one hand, we now have streaming audio and, on the other hand, we have the movement away from compressed digital formats toward higher-resolution digital files. The CD...
 
Ocean Way Recording began in a garage in Santa Monica, California, in 1968, as a place to showcase owner Allen Side's custom monitors. From these humble beginnings the empire expanded to include...
 
Ace Hotel has long been a favorite among artist/studio types, so when we heard the news that they were going to beginoffering quality recording gear as a literal hotel service, it made sense. Featured behind their tailored front desk you'll find...
 
The name Jim Scott has graced many excellent albums since he made his debut as first engineer on Sting's The Dream of the Blue Turtles. Artists as varied as the Dixie Chicks, Wilco, John Fogerty, the...
 
Soundtoys Decapitator has been around for a while now, and it's one of my favorite plug-ins. I was surprised when Andy Hong asked if I wanted to review it — oddly, it had never been reviewed in...
 
The legendary TG12345 consoles made by EMI are very rare and scattered around the world, from England to Brazil. If you have scratched the surface of recording history, you know the impact that EMI...
 
Sometimes, it's right in front of your face, and you just don't see it. You're working with your preconceptions and past experiences — and it takes a little time, a flat out mistake, or just...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Mar/Apr 1999 issue of Tape Op!

Many people seem to wonder what the TAPE OP agenda is all about. I get letters asking why there's not more articles on 4 track recording. Others want to know why it seems all the articles are on "studio guys." Well, the secret is that there is no planned agenda in what we cover. It's determined by what our many writers are interested in, what cool sounding CDs arrive in the mail, recording people who contact us, and many other factors. It's also important to note that many more interviews are discussed, executed and even finished than what you see in a current issue... we try to pick the cream of the crop and present a well-balanced magazine.

It's also important to remember that no matter what you are doing, it still ends up as a couple of tracks of audio in a playback system. We can spend all day talking about which mic will make a kick drum sound better, but in the end what really matters is if there's something fun to listen to. There is no right, there is no wrong, but there are lots of great albums out there to make.

#12

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