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Additions to TapeOp.com

Ted Nugent, REO Speedwagon, Poison, Mötley Crüe, Molly Hatchet, Twisted Sister. When pitching this article to Tape Op, it was not lost on me that many of the artists that Tom Werman signed...
 
For eighteen years, numerous albums, EPs, tribute tracks and even a four-CD box set of rarities, Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow have shared a passion for creating recordings, as songwriters,...
 
What's the attraction of vintage consoles? There's no denying that a classic console will look incredible in your studio and make a great investment, too. But the real draw will always be the...
 
What is the attraction of vintage microphones? While we all may spend more hands-on studio time with our outboard gear, our console, and so on, there's undoubtedly a uniquely personal connection we...
 
Vintage King co-founder Michael Nehra shares some of his love, knowledge, and practical advice for diving into the world of vintage audio gear, and then takes us behind the scenes for a walk through...
 
CreativeLive is pretty damn cool. It was founded in 2010 by these two pro media guys Chase Jarvis and Craig Swanson, who partnered to create a real time online space where the world's top working creatives could connect with a global audience of...
 
"Consider a rock band with two guitars, bass and a keyboard guy with a Rhodes or Hammond. It is possible everyone will have their own tuner, and know how to use it. But after you roll tape, you discover that someone is out of tune. They all check...
 
Veteran Bay Area recording engineer John Cuniberti has been professionally making records since the late 70's. Aside from the feature interview we did with him back in 2006, we also asked him if he could distill the essentials of what he learned...
 
Our friends at Disc Makers just put out a free guide that succinctly lays out how to make the most of a social media presence as a musician and/or record maker. Obviously social media is a hot button topic right now, but we like this particular guide...
 
Yesterday, electronic musician, producer, educator, and all around tech-forward-woman-in-audio, Erin Barra, is releasing "Dear John," the single from her upcoming EP, Undefined. Barra, however, is taking a much more literal approach to the term -...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Mar/Apr 2014 issue of Tape Op!

This issue marks the occasion of our 100th issue of Tape Op. As I sat on my front steps 18 years ago, spray painting photocopied magazine covers by hand, I never would've imagined that my crazy little idea would ever have carried on this long, found so many readers, or become such a huge part of my life. Over the years Tape Op has certainly changed. What started as a magazine mostly focused on creating and tracking what would become known as "indie rock" (hey, that was the world I mucked about in!), has become a forum about working with every style of music, from any era. While early issues featured ads from small record labels and independent book stores, the last 15 years have seen advertising for every kind of recording product one could imagine; even including Pabst Blue Ribbon beer, at one point.

But while there have been changes, I feel that the core values of this magazine remain the same, even if they're not always visible on the surface. Creativity, passion, beauty, excitement, and honesty remain an important backbone for what we discuss and promote in these pages. Pushing the art of recording forward, while always respecting the artist and the music, is key as well. Almost everyone involved in Tape Op records music, and most of us at the professional level. When we interview a recordist it is as a peer, not simply as a journalist or a fan (though we can wear those hats too). I think these things are just the tip of the iceberg as to what makes Tape Op different, as well as what draws our readers to the magazine.

For this issue I trawled through 100 old copies of this mag and found 100 corresponding quotes - one from each issue. I've always seen Tape Op as an extension of my own growth and learning when it comes to recording music, and many of these quotes are ones that have resonated with me for years. John La Grou, owner of Millennia Media and a fine recordist himself, has written up a piece for us on his thoughts about the future of music production - you may be surprised (or distraught) to learn where he thinks it is heading. Gerald Seligman of The National Recording Preservation Foundation discusses preserving historical recordings. Barry Cleveland illustrates many of Joe Meek's innovations in the studio.

There's far more about the future and the past of recording in this issue, so get to it. And get ready for another 100 issues of Tape Op!

Enjoy!

Larry Crane, Editor

PS: Many thanks and a raised glass of wine to my partner/publisher/friend John Baccigaluppi. Without him Tape Op probably would have disappeared into a fog of credit card debt and exhaustion 14 years ago. He believed in my vision, and took it up a big notch overnight. He is the backbone that lets this magazine flourish, and I don't think it could be what it is without his hard work and input. Also I owe a HUGE thanks to the many contributors and "staff" over the years. Many of you are my close friends and have helped guide the magazine. You know who you are. Thank you.  

#100

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