Hi. Tape Op is made possible by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.

<     Issue #86     >

 
 
 
 

Hi. Tape Op
is made
possible
by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.

 

Additions to TapeOp.com

The name Jim Scott has graced many excellent albums since he made his debut as first engineer on Sting's The Dream of the Blue Turtles. Artists as varied as the Dixie Chicks, Wilco, John Fogerty, the...
 
Soundtoys Decapitator has been around for a while now, and it's one of my favorite plug-ins. I was surprised when Andy Hong asked if I wanted to review it — oddly, it had never been reviewed in...
 
The legendary TG12345 consoles made by EMI are very rare and scattered around the world, from England to Brazil. If you have scratched the surface of recording history, you know the impact that EMI...
 
Sometimes, it's right in front of your face, and you just don't see it. You're working with your preconceptions and past experiences — and it takes a little time, a flat out mistake, or just...
 
Carol Kaye is one of the most recorded bass players of all time, with 10,000 sessions and 40,000 songs under her belt, including a staggering list of hits for Ray Charles, The Righteous Brothers,...
 
You kids today and your audio interfaces. Back in my day, we had to trudge five miles uphill in the snow by foot to a dilapidated brick and mortar music shop, then find the one crusty, bitter employee...
 
This is the most innovative headphone I've ever seen, and it sounds great. Its low-frequency reproduction is especially impressive — better than any headphone in my collection. But before we...
 
Any one of Les Paul's amazing careers would make him remarkable. His wide-ranging excellence (and longevity) make him a legend and a living treasure. He is in the hall of fame for songwriting,...
 
When Roland's AIRA line was announced at NAMM last year, it was the buzz of the show, mainly for the new instruments inspired by the classic TR-808, TB-303 and SH-101. The VT-3 seemed a bit like the...
 
When Mike Rutherford steps in to his hotel lobby from the busy New York City streets, there's barely a stir. Though tall and remarkably unchanged from his days as the guitarist in Genesis and...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Nov/Dec 2011 issue of Tape Op!

While interviewing Bob Weston in 2000 for Tape Op #18, one of his comments took me by surprise. He told me, "Some bands just assume I won't record them. They assume I'm too busy, that I'm too expensive or that I only approach bands. When I hear that someone's afraid to call me, or assumes they can't call me, I can't even believe it." I'd always assumed since Bob worked on records that my friends and I bought and listened to that he was a hot commodity in the studio and that he was able to pick and choose projects to suit his taste and timeframe. The reality is that he was (gratefully) taking most any job that came down the pike in order to keep busy.

People's perceptions of how busy, inaccessible or picky a producer/engineer might be are often skewed. Most of us are easy to contact (see Vance Powell's, "People wonder how to find me and I say, 'Google me!'" in #82). Many folks are far more affordable than their

credits might lead you to believe. And everyone needs work; no matter how "cool" their job may appear. I recently talked to a good friend of mine who had a number of weeks work disappear overnight when a record label changed their mind on a band, and he's the kind of producer whom you might assume was always busy. We all live mostly day-to-day in this business (those of us crazy enough to attempt to make it a full time job) and what keeps clients coming our way is word of mouth, our back catalogs and musicians who wish to work with us. So to all the artists out there who admire the work of anyone on the other side of the glass, please consider that we might be much more available than you assume and that we'd be happy to work with you on any project.

#86

Hi. Tape Op is only made possible by our advertisers.

Please support them by clicking on their ads.