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Additions to TapeOp.com

I've pulled together a collection of recent thoughts I've had about the recording process. You can agree or not agree. The important thing is to use your ears, mind, and creativity to make great recordings. Recording equipment...
 
What do Bob Dylan, Lucinda Williams, LL Cool J, Ozzy Osbourne, Tom Petty, Johnny Cash, U2, Mick Jagger, AC/DC, The Damned, The Posies, and Rage Against the Machine all have in common? They all...
 
 
BreakTweaker is a fantastic new rhythm/drum-sequencing plug-in from iZotope and Grammy-nominated musician, producer, and all-around genius Brian Transeau (better known as BT). Their previous...
 
Somehow, a strap-on keyboard can pass as dorky/cool, especially with the rise of "nerdcore." But IMHO, a synth guitar is just... well... dorky, and always will be. Just check YouTube for shredders...
 
Don Zientara is a name I became familiar with simply by seeing it over and over again on record, and then CD, liner notes. From his Inner Ear Studios, he's been engineering and producing...
 
Our pal and Tape Op contributor Ryan Hewitt told us he's hosting another one of his Studio Prodigy Master Class sessions in Valencia, CA on November 8 and 9 with Jim Scott. We interviewed Jim in Tape Op #75 and we speak from experience when we...
 
I've tried a lot of different iOS software synthesizers, but this app is probably the most enjoyable and best sounding soft synth I've used to date — on an iPad or a computer — and it has...
 
As we pack our bags and prepare to head down to Los Angeles for the 137th Audio Engineering Society Convention (here is how the thing began in 1948), we thought we'd drop you a line and let you know what we'll be up to once we get there. Come...
 
We are missing the departed Lou Whitney today. Here's Vance Powell's fantastic interview with him from Tape Op #98 for everyone to read. - LC
 
 
 

Welcome to the Nov/Dec 2012 issue of Tape Op!

How do we get better at the craft of recording music? For me, and from what I've gleaned over the years from other producers and engineers, there is one simple fact: I am never 100 percent happy with the work I have done. Every studio session presents unique challenges, and each time I end up making a few choices I am less than thrilled about or other times maybe I don't take action when I should. Mind you, the records I make aren't ruined by my decisions, and I'm probably the only one that notices these issues. This isn't about some perceived goal of perfection - I don't labor under the belief that every drum hit should be in exact time or that every note has to be impeccably pitched. For me it's about the small details that could have been captured better: the choice of a certain mic, the tone of an amp, the tempo of a song or length of a chorus. I keep a mental log of all the times I've let myself down in any way. And, as I start a new session, I push myself further to look out for anything that might need more attention. This is how we get better - because we never look back and think that we've done the perfect job. Never.

-Larry Crane, Editor

#92

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