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Additions to TapeOp.com

It was at a recent trade show, after a major DAW manufacturer cancelled our meeting, that I realized I was relieved to be off the hook. I always enjoy meeting with this person, and I use and like their products. But I was relieved to not hear...
 
Ted Nugent, REO Speedwagon, Poison, Mötley Crüe, Molly Hatchet, Twisted Sister. When pitching this article to Tape Op, it was not lost on me that many of the artists that Tom Werman signed...
 
For eighteen years, numerous albums, EPs, tribute tracks and even a four-CD box set of rarities, Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow have shared a passion for creating recordings, as songwriters,...
 
What's the attraction of vintage consoles? There's no denying that a classic console will look incredible in your studio and make a great investment, too. But the real draw will always be the...
 
What is the attraction of vintage microphones? While we all may spend more hands-on studio time with our outboard gear, our console, and so on, there's undoubtedly a uniquely personal connection we...
 
Vintage King co-founder Michael Nehra shares some of his love, knowledge, and practical advice for diving into the world of vintage audio gear, and then takes us behind the scenes for a walk through...
 
CreativeLive is pretty damn cool. It was founded in 2010 by these two pro media guys Chase Jarvis and Craig Swanson, who partnered to create a real time online space where the world's top working creatives could connect with a global audience of...
 
"Consider a rock band with two guitars, bass and a keyboard guy with a Rhodes or Hammond. It is possible everyone will have their own tuner, and know how to use it. But after you roll tape, you discover that someone is out of tune. They all check...
 
Veteran Bay Area recording engineer John Cuniberti has been professionally making records since the late 70's. Aside from the feature interview we did with him back in 2006, we also asked him if he could distill the essentials of what he learned...
 
Our friends at Disc Makers just put out a free guide that succinctly lays out how to make the most of a social media presence as a musician and/or record maker. Obviously social media is a hot button topic right now, but we like this particular guide...
 
 
 

Welcome to the Jan/Feb 2013 issue of Tape Op!

Imagine that you've become somewhat comfortable recording songwriters and bands in your very modest home studio. It's been fun; you've pushed the gear to its limits to get half-decent results, and you've already got a few loyal clients. Then you get the call, "Hey, we've been working in a pro studio and aren't happy with the mixes. Could you come down and help us out?" Panic and fear take over. How will you be able to figure out all this unfamiliar gear, in a different room? What will the speakers sound like? Certainly they should just find someone else. But this is also the moment you've been waiting for. What do you do?

This is the exact situation I found myself in nearly 20 years ago. I took the challenge. The studio manager gave me his home number on the way out the door saying, "You'll be calling me." He said it with a bit of resignation, capped with a raised eyebrow and a grin. He knew I was green as heck. What did I do? I asked that the house engineer (who seemed wholly unhappy with this situation) explain the signal routing to me, and I made sure the console output fed the DAT machine before he left for home. I brought headphones along that I knew well, and a boombox with some blank cassettes in order to make sure the mix would hold up in the real world. I only used EQ or compression when it was needed, and I listened closely to what was happening to the tracks. But mostly I tried to sculpt the mixes closer to what had been working for us previously in my basement studio. I kept everything very simple and worked with what I knew - and I didn't spend any extra time exploring gear I wasn't familiar with. The mixes came out pretty good and they made the cut for the CD release, along with tracks from my home studio. But no matter what I did that night, I made sure I never called the studio manager for help. No way would I do that. I had to prove I could do this, and I did.

-Larry Crane, Editor 

#93

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