May/Jun 2004

Welcome to issue #41 of Tape Op.

 

Right after turning 40, we're putting out our biggest issue to date, and there's no shortage of strong opinions in this one. Walter Sear's thoughts on DIY recording might ire lots of long time Tape Op readers, while Walter's and Jay Bennett's take on gear will probably have some manufacturers pissed off. But remember, Tape Op is about presenting a variety of opinions on recording music. Any advice is good advice and learning from those who have been there is as important as learning on your own. Plus, few would deny the creative and great recordings made by Jay, Walter, Sigur Rós, Pauline Oliveros, David Minehan, Joel Hamilton and Tony Maimone.

This issue comes out right before the Third Annual TapeOpCon in New Orleans. I'm excited to visit this special city and moderate interviews and panels with Cosimo Matassa, Jim Dickinson, Tony Visconti, Mark Bingham, Joe Chiccarelli, Billy Anderson, John Vanderslice, Don Zientara and others! I'm already nervous. I went through a list of the panelists while putting bios together and was overwhelmed by the amount of talent that we'll be presenting. It will be a blast — plus in New Orleans you can drink in the street. Who knows what insanity will prevail?

Many people have asked if we will be making audio or video versions of the conference available. No plans are set yet, and to be honest the current workload makes it difficult to consider taking on this money and time- intensive project. We'll see, and you'll know if we do. Just keep in mind the amount of work and risk involved in doing TapeOpCon and be sure to buy Craig Schumacher a beer if you can get him to hold still for a second!

See you in New Orleans, Larry Crane

P.S. Sometimes it's really hard to get good photos for interviews in Tape Op. It seems like a lot of engineers just don't think visually and give us some pretty weak graphics for their interviews. This is one of the main reasons why some interviews never run. And then we sometimes get a plethora of great photos like the ones in Walter's interview and the photos that regular contributor, Jodi Shapiro, took for Tony Maimone and Pauline Oliveros. In fact, we weren't able to use all of Jodi's photos of Studio G, so that's why we're running two more of them: The photo on this page and the front cover photo.

— Larry Crane, editor

In This Issue See more →

David Minehan

by Jason Hatfield

David Minehan played guitar, sang and wrote songs for the Boston punk band The Neighborhoods from 1979-1992. After the 'Hoods he played guitar with Paul Westerberg on the 14 Songs tour and even filled...

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Gear Reviews See more →

Personal Orchestra

by Garritan  |  reviewed by Mike Jasper

Gary Garritan, owner of Garritan Orchestral Libraries, has just released Garritan Personal Orchestra (GPO), a full orchestral software-sampler program for $249 plus $15 shipping. Now that's news,...

C-Valve mic pre, C-Com opti compressor

by Samson Audio  |  reviewed by Tim Pratt

Not too long ago, Samson Audio decided to enter the realm of low cost/good performance audio equipment with the introduction of their line of C Class processors. Amongst these stackable, half rack...

Ursa Major Space Station SST-206

by Seven Woods Audio  |  reviewed by Mark Owen

Over the years there have been many devices that have claimed to recreate room ambiences artificially, which is not entirely untrue. Yet it is to be noted that most of these devices have more pages to...

9762 Dual-Combo Mic Preamp

by RTZ Audio  |  reviewed by Larry Crane

One of the joys of doing this mag is checking out recording gear from small companies that are just starting out... and doing so before anyone else! Bob Starr is connected with our friends at Zero...

DPS-R7 Digital Reverb

by Sony  |  reviewed by Chris Garges

The DPS-R7 is part of the single-rackspace series that Sony manufactured in the early 90s. It has 100 factory presets and room to store 256 user-created settings. The front panel has a scroll knob,...

PEQ1 Preamp/EQ Module

by Wunder Audio  |  reviewed by Garrett Haines

The PEQ1 is a Class-A, discrete mic-preamp and equalizer that can be used as a replacement module in vintage Neve 80-series consoles. For those who don't have an 80-series, a 19'' rackmount version of...

Kontakt

by Native Instruments  |  reviewed by AJ

After reading John's review of various software samplers in the last issue, I thought I'd give my opinion as to what's happening in the soft-sampler scene. NI touts Kontakt as the most advanced...

Luna, Solaris

by M-Audio  |  reviewed by AJ

I recently got to try out M-Audio's new large- diaphragm condenser mics. The two are well constructed and moderately priced (though not as dirt cheap as the many bargain-basement Chinese condensers...

Lug Lock

by L.T. Lug Lock  |  reviewed by Rick Wise

Recording drums has always seemed to be more of a hassle than recording other instruments. A lot of this can be attributed to multiple microphones, phasing, etc. One area of recording drums that has...

Logic Pro 6.0 Upgrade

by Apple  |  reviewed by AJ

I recently updated my Logic Platinum installation to Logic Pro 6 and wanted to mention some of the additions and improvements (besides the slicker-looking graphics). One major new feature is the...

IR-1 Convolution Reverb Plug-in

by Waves  |  reviewed by Larry Crane

Hey kids, a convolution reverb is a big word that means this is a reverb that has actual sampled (IR Short for impulse response) spaces in it. That's right, instead of suffering with digitally-modeled...

Transmod Plug-in

by Sony Oxford Group  |  reviewed by John Baccigaluppi

I seem to recall Steve Albini saying something at one of the TapeOpCons about how he wished there was a box that could turn the hi-hat down on a drummer's kit. Well, since he doesn't use Pro Tools, he...

Aural-Xpanders

by Auralex  |  reviewed by John Baccigaluppi

This is such an ingenious, useful, and simple product that I'm surprised nobody came up with it earlier. But Auralex continues to figure out new ways to make acoustic foam useful in the studio, so...

 

Tape Op is a bi-monthly magazine devoted to the art of record making.

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